ADVANCE Salary Survey 2008

0

Nursing shortage begins to level out.

During the recent nursing shortage, facilities across the U.S. hiked salaries to fill vacancies. In various parts of the country, however, the nursing shortage is leveling out. Are salaries following suit?

Our numbers say yes. Nearly 7,500 nurses filled out ADVANCE‘s salary survey on our interactive Salary Calculator, and the results indicate that changes might be afoot.*

The average nurse salary dropped this year, down from $59,650 in 2007 to $56,785 this year. That dip is right in line with what industry experts are noticing.

Pamela Dellinger, PhD, RN,C, CHCR, recruitment specialist for Carolinas Medical Center Lincoln, Lincolnton, NC , and immediate past president of the National Association of Health Care Recruiters, is not surprised by the finding.

Why? In the nursing profession, many nurses “are topped out on the salary scale, which flattens the salary,” she said. “We see nurses with 12-15+ years of experience making the same base pay yearly, receiving only a [cost-of-living] yearly adjustment. These are the nurses we are trying desperately to keep in the profession.”

Another reason for the slightly lower salaries, Dellinger noted, is a decrease in sign-on bonuses, which initially worked as a stop-gap measure, but ultimately led to job-hopping among new hires and were often morale-busters for veterans.

To compensate for the shrinking increases in base pay, some facilities are beginning to focus on benefits. While slightly more employees fully pay for their health coverage this year (8.2 percent, compared to 7 percent in the 2007 survey), and there was a very small decrease in the number of employers who fully provide health coverage (12.5 percent in 2008, down from 13 percent), the tide may yet start turning.

“During our National Association of Health Care Recruiters conference in July 2007,” said Dellinger, “I heard many facility HR VPs and recruiters discuss options to keep the experienced RN in acute care settings via benefits, job sharing, and reduced hours from 12-hour shifts and salary changes.”

Other findings from the salary survey:

· male nurses continue to out-earn their female counterparts, bringing in an average salary of $53,792 versus $50,615 for female nurses. However, both genders saw dips in overall average salary: male nurses earned an average of $60,880 in 2007; female nurses made $59,500;

· 39 percent of nurses work overtime. This figure is up from 34 percent in 2007 – and from 22 percent in 2005; and

· 45 percent of respondents reported earning a shift differential, up from 38 percent in 2007.

Want to know more? Keep reading for the national and regional salary scoop.

*  Data presented in this article were pulled from the Salary Calculator found on www.advanceweb.com. Results are based on the number of people who responded to each question. The data should be viewed as a general guide; the salaries and numbers reflected here may differ from those in your area of practice.

View National Salary Charts
View Regional Salary Charts

National Salary Charts

National Average Nurse Salary
State Salary Averages
Are You a Member of a Union?
Do You Earn a Shift Differential?
Average Salary by Credentials
Average Raise
Do You Work Overtime?
National Average Home Price
Average Salary by Location
Healthcare Benefits
Ethnic Diversity
Salary by Gender
Salary Facility Beds
Job Responsibilities

Regional Salary Charts

PA, NJ, DE
Facility Type Salary
Average Salary by Zip Code
Job Title & Salary
State Raise Percentages
Union Membership & Raise Amount
Years of Experience & Salary
Salary by professional Fields
Salary: RN Only vs. Specialty-Certified RN

Maryland, Washington, DC, and Virginia
Facility Type & Salary
Average Salary by Zip Code
Job Title & Salary
State Raise Percentages
Union Membership & Raise Amount
Years of Experience & Salary
Salary by professional Fields
Salary: RN Only vs. Specialty-Certified RN

Southeastern States
State Raise Percentages
Years of Experience & Salary
Job Title & Salary
Facility Type & Salary
Salary: RN vs. Specialty-Certified RN (regional)

Florida
Job Title & Salary
Years of Experience & Salary
State Raise Percentages
Facility Type & Salary
Salary: RN vs. Specialty-Certified RN

Greater New York/New Jersey Metro Area
Local Salaries by Area
Facility Type & Salary
Job Title & Salary
Salary by Professional Field
Average Salary by Zip Code
State Raise Percentages
Salary: RN Only vs. Specialty-Certified RN
Union Membership & Raise Percentage
Years of Experience & Salary

New England
Average Salary by Zip Code
Facility Type & Salary
Job Title & Salary

Union Membership & Raise Amount
Salary by Professional Fields
Salary: RN Only vs. Specialty-Certified RN
Years of Experience & Salary

Greater Chicago & Metro Areas of Wisconsin & Indiana
Regional Raises
RN Only vs. Specialty-Certified RN
Facility Type & Salary
Salary by Title
Years of Experience & Salary

Metro Areas of Texas & Louisiana
RN Only vs. Specialty-Certified RN
Regional Raises
Facility Type & Salary
Salary by Job Title
Years of Experience & Salary

Southern California
RN Only vs. Specialty-Certified RN
State Raises
Job Title & Salary
Years of Experience & Salary
Union Membership & Raise Amount
Facility Type & Salary

Northern California & Northern Nevada
RN Only vs. Specialty-Certified RN
State Raises
Job Title & Salary
Years of Experience & Salary
Union Membership & Raise Amount
Facility Type & Salary

Share.

846 words

About Author

Leave A Reply

Log in or register to comment on this article.