Change Is Coming!

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Embracing a profession where no two days are the same

Nursing is a career filled with constant change. Procedures and policies are being updated, leading to changes in practice.

Fortunately, nurses are becoming more and more educated and performing added evidence-based practice research—a huge driving force to lead to change because of improving current standards.

Looking back on pictures of operating rooms from a decade ago shows even more evidence of change. Everything is becoming more modernized and technologically advanced. Nurses have been expected to adapt with ease, although change can be very intimidating and scary until you become used to it.

It is not always easy to go with the flow. Sometimes workers will even form committees to stop the change from being implemented or reverse it. But change will always be a part of our nursing world as we continue to evolve into expectations of higher standards of care. Consider the changes we have seen throughout our careers or just throughout your life? Think of how far cell phones have come!

Recently, I made a big change in my nursing career. I went from my first nursing job—a general medical-surgical floor I had worked on for almost five years—to a step-down cardiac unit.

My original floor was like a second home. I knew everyone, knew how everyone was, what they liked, what they disliked, etc. So why change?

My new floor is on a higher level of care then what I was currently practicing. I wanted to change to something more critical for the sake of my own career advancement. Other factors that impacted my decision to transfer was that I was in the oldest section of the hospital with double-occupied rooms. I went to a floor that is brand new, with all private rooms, and computers in every room.

The new rooms have so much space and I am no longer constantly tripping over cords and equipment. Work environment is a huge satisfaction piece for employees. Also there had been some changes in staff and let’s be honest—you don’t get along with all your co-workers no matter how hard you try.
Managers make a huge difference as well in whether or not you want to stay on a floor or in a job. If your current job does not make you happy, that’s a big hint to look elsewhere.

The great thing about nursing is you can always change where you are working or easily transfer to other opportunities. So far, I am beyond happy and excited about the change I made, even though it was a little scary to start out somewhere brand new again. But, that is the thing about change, it doesn’t have to be bad or intimidating, sometimes it is the best option.

What are some changes you have made recently? Is there anything you would like to change about your current job? Or nursing? Nurses are the driving force for recognizing what needs to be changed and leading that change.

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About Author

sam_cremi
Sam Cremi

Sam Cremi is 24 years old and has been a nurse for nearly five years. She attended the Reading Hospital School of Health Sciences in Reading, PA and received her nursing diploma. She later attended Chamberlain School of Nursing online while working to achieve a bachelor's degree. She is currently applying to schools to pursue her nurse practitioner’s certification.

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